Preventing Termite Destruction in Your House

It’s no news that termites and white ants cause severe damages to the home. They might attack your house in no time. Hence, termite control has become one of the necessities to prevent the termites from invading your house. Some people control termites by using chemicals in residential areas or working places, where they can survive and breathe.

Important things to know about termites

  • Termites generally lay their eggs in the spring season. They give eggs in the moist soil and then enter the house to provide some nourishment to them. Therefore, it is better to control termites before the beginning of spring season. However, be careful as termites can attack in any season.
  • Two places to look for termites are the kitchen and the bathroom because in these two areas there is maximum use of water. Regularly check the pipes and taps for leakage. If you own a house or farm made of wood, then controlling termite infestation should be your top most priority. It is one of the crucial issues or problems faced by homeowners.

Primarily, start with termite prevention. If you do not have termites, it does not mean that you cannot have them. So, stop them from invading your crops or properties. To prevent the termites, you have to make your home an unfavorable hideout for termites. Following are some ways of preventing termites from invading your house:

  1. Trim all dense greenery, bushes, and shrubs away from your property’s foundation.
  2. Never leave firewood around your house; it works as a magnet for attracting termites. If you have to keep firewood outside your home during the winter season, then keep it at some height off the ground.
  3. Remove all loose woods, tree stumps and lumber from the boundary of your home.
  4. Keep downspouts and gutters free of accumulated debris and leaves. As termites cannot survive on wood only, keeping these areas clean will prevent termites from invading your house. Obstructions and clogs attract termites.
  5. Seal all holes and any cracks in the foundation of your home. Termite prevention is possible only if you keep your house ventilated, particularly the attics of the house. Your rooms should be spacious enough to have the right circulation of air, as moisture attracts termites. Never allow water to be stored anywhere around your house as it may lead to severe house damage.

It is always better to opt for termite prevention before the construction of your property. If you plan to construct a house entirely from wood, then ensure to use treated wood. Borate is one of the most common treated woods that prevent the termite from invading them as their food. Do not allow the wood to have any contact with the earth because this will give easy access to the termites.

What to Do About Bees in Your Yard

If you’ve read the news in the last few years you’ve likely heard about the alarming decline of the bee population. In our daily lives, most of us think of bees only when they’re buzzing uncomfortably close to our picnic table. What we don’t often realize is the vital role that bees play in pollenating our food supply.

Large farms throughout the country (and throughout the world) hire beekeepers to bring in their colonies for pollination. Without those bees there would be a drastic drop in food production. While drops in bee populations are naturally occurring and fluctuate from year to year, recent years have seen some of the worst declines to date.

Starting to feel bad about swatting at the bees in your backyard?

First you should understand that these declines aren’t your fault because you’ve killed a few bees in your life. Among the stresses that the bee population faces are viruses, mites, climate change, and habitat reduction. It would take a massive culture shift to address all of those issues. But, there are a few things you can do right in your backyard that will lend a small hand in helping out your local bee population.

Know your bees (and what’s not a bee)

Many people treat bees, wasps and hornets as interchangeable. Bees are fuzzy pollinators that can sting only once. Common bees include honey bees, bumble bees, and carpenter bees.

Wasps are not fuzzy, and therefore not as effective as pollinators. They prey on insects and can be more aggressive than bees. The only wasps that sting are females, but they can sting multiple times.

Hornets are a sub-species of wasp native to North America. They too can sting multiple times and are known for being the most aggressive of the three. Again, they are not the most effective pollinators.

Bees, wasps, and your backyard

If you’ve noticed an uptick in the number of bees or wasps on you property it’s not necessarily a bad thing. If their numbers are low and you’re not concerned about anyone’s safety you may decide to leave them be. The bees and wasps will help you by pollinating your flowers, eating surplus insects, and leaving you well alone.

Some ways you can keep your backyard bees healthy include not using pesticides on your lawn or garden. You could also plant more flowers and let your wildflowers grow freely to provide an extra nectar source for the local bees.

Too much of a good thing

If the bees in your yard have grown high in number, are becoming aggressive, or you are worried for the safety of your family (bee sting allergies can be life-threatening) then it might be time to take action.

To avoid becoming part of the problem of declining populations, call in a professional. Some pest control companies still use killing the bees as a solution. But there are companies that are more proactive and attempt to coax away bees and relocate them. Seek out no-kill pest control companies for help.

Your local beekeeper is also an unexpendable resource when it comes to learning what to do about bees. Many beekeepers will even relocate the bees to commercial honey-making hives.

With a bit of research and careful behavior, cohabiting with bees can be beneficial for us and for the little bugs that make our honey.